Worcester County Businesses

Reliable Business Directories combined with the Power of Inbound Linking

The other day I was making my way towards a busy line at the bank when a woman started to cut me off. In that instant I remembered that it’s the holiday season and stepped aside and said “After you Ma’am.”
I made a mental note.
Over the weekend, I found myself racing and trying to catch […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


© Paul Castain for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags:

Pop Quiz: What’s your game plan once someone accepts your social networking invite?
Do you just leave it to chance while you race off to invite the next “connection”? Or . . .
Do you launch immediately into your best infomercial?
Sorry for the Monday morning reality check but I’m willing to bet that most people would fail […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


© Paul Castain for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags:

blog3


© Lisa March for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags:

It’s a rather troubling feeling to wake up each morning knowing you could be more than you have become.
Add to it this feeling of urgency to do something with your life . . . but what?
This was me for the better part of my adult life.
Yes, I had risen from the proverbial ashes after losing […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


© Paul Castain for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags:

Pantone vs. Process

Pantone vs. Process

The process of offset and digital printing has truly become a science, particularly when it comes to color. One of the biggest challenges in printing is getting the colors just right. Basically, any type of printing that includes a full color photograph will require process printing.  Process printing utilizes a mix of the four CMYK colors; Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black.  Printing requirements where only one or two colors are required, such as business stationery, typically is printed utilizing Pantone Colors.

In the past, process color has typically been more expense, particularly if utilizing the offset printing method, where 4 pieces of film, plates, and inks would be required to print the job. For this reason, one, two, and sometimes three color jobs would utilize Pantone colors, specific colors that are an exact match to a Pantone numbering system that is utilized to get the right color match.  With the advent of digital printing, which primarily uses the 4 color process method, some of the rules have changed. Now when making decisions as to how a project should be printed, a lot of the decision making is based on the colors you want to match. One limitation with process color is matching certain colors. CMYK mixing is limited as to the colors that can be created from those four colors. You can particularly notice this in the blue range where a lot of times the blues will appear more purplish than they should. For this reason, if no full color photography or graphics are in the printed piece, utilizing a Pantone ink color, say PMS286 will give you the exact match you want.  For large printing jobs, where both 4 color process printing is required, but also Pantone color matching is required to match a company branded color, there are presses that print 5,6,8 or even 10 colors.  Printing on these presses can certainly be expensive if the quantities are small, but on large jobs the cost can be affordable and the quality exceptional.

As a general rule, if color matching is not super critical but overall quality is, then either hi-end digital printing or “gang” offset printing is typically the way to go. Though digital printing has gotten to the point now where it is very difficult to tell the difference, in my opinion offset is still the way to go if the cost is comparable. As mentioned before “gang” printing, which is running several jobs together at once to help keep costs down, is an excellent option.

In conclusion, there are various subtleties when choosing the method by which your project will be printed. You will want to take into consideration the paper color, weight, and finish, as well as grain direction if the job is being folded or scored and if you want any type of coating applied to the finished piece. With the many choices available it is definitely a good idea to sit down with an experienced printer to help you decide how the job should be printed and why.


© Lisa March for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags:

There’s a famous story that the late David Ogilvy told regarding his early years in advertising.
Please allow me to paraphrase . . .
He had an appointment with some obnoxious ass, who said something along the lines of “You will be given 3 minutes to offer your pitch. At the end of the allotted time I […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


© Paul Castain for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags:

I went to Starbucks this morning to get some work done and to grow my hair back via large doses of caffeine.
Low and freakin behold I come across two “Pacers” on their cell phone.
Time Out . . . I bet you don’t know what a “Pacer” is.
A “Pacer” is someone who walks back and forth […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


© Paul Castain for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags:

Pantone vs. Process

Pantone vs. Process

The process of offset and digital printing has truly become a science, particularly when it comes to color. One of the biggest challenges in printing is getting the colors just right. Basically, any type of printing that includes a full color photograph will require process printing.  Process printing utilizes a mix of the four CMYK colors; Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black.  Printing requirements where only one or two colors are required, such as business stationery, typically is printed utilizing Pantone Colors.

In the past, process color has typically been more expense, particularly if utilizing the offset printing method, where 4 pieces of film, plates, and inks would be required to print the job. For this reason, one, two, and sometimes three color jobs would utilize Pantone colors, specific colors that are an exact match to a Pantone numbering system that is utilized to get the right color match.  With the advent of digital printing, which primarily uses the 4 color process method, some of the rules have changed. Now when making decisions as to how a project should be printed, a lot of the decision making is based on the colors you want to match. One limitation with process color is matching certain colors. CMYK mixing is limited as to the colors that can be created from those four colors. You can particularly notice this in the blue range where a lot of times the blues will appear more purplish than they should. For this reason, if no full color photography or graphics are in the printed piece, utilizing a Pantone ink color, say PMS286 will give you the exact match you want.  For large printing jobs, where both 4 color process printing is required, but also Pantone color matching is required to match a company branded color, there are presses that print 5,6,8 or even 10 colors.  Printing on these presses can certainly be expensive if the quantities are small, but on large jobs the cost can be affordable and the quality exceptional.

As a general rule, if color matching is not super critical but overall quality is, then either hi-end digital printing or “gang” offset printing is typically the way to go. Though digital printing has gotten to the point now where it is very difficult to tell the difference, in my opinion offset is still the way to go if the cost is comparable. As mentioned before “gang” printing, which is running several jobs together at once to help keep costs down, is an excellent option.

In conclusion, there are various subtleties when choosing the method by which your project will be printed. You will want to take into consideration the paper color, weight, and finish, as well as grain direction if the job is being folded or scored and if you want any type of coating applied to the finished piece. With the many choices available it is definitely a good idea to sit down with an experienced printer to help you decide how the job should be printed and why.

When was the last time you offered an idea to one of your clients?
Many times (actually too many times) we only offer our ideas when there’s an active order on the table.
When the proverbial meter is running!
Even then, we might only think within the confines of our product or service.
Don’t ever underestimate the power of […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


© Paul Castain for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags:

Firstlook

I always encourage couples to see each other before the ceremony so that all of the posed photos can be completed without the time constraints of cocktail hour. Weddings are a lot more expensive than they used to be and you should enjoy every moment with family and friends, as well as every hor d’oeuvre.

You decided to invest in wedding photography, so make sure that you schedule enough time for that investment to pay off. When the photographer can be creative and relaxed, you are getting the most bang for your buck.

Remember, a wedding is an event dependent on others being on schedule for it to go exactly according to plan. Which means it probably won’t go exactly according to plan. With a first look and photo session scheduled before the ceremony you can leave as much time as you choose to ensure that even if things run late, you will still get the photos you deserve. I always tell couples, “If the worst thing that happens, is that you have extra time to hang out, relax, drink champagne, and be with your loved ones, that’s the way to go.”

But instead of listening to the opinion of an objective photographer, listen to a former JG Photography Bride, Jenna Wilson. She had a beautiful First Look moment and a wonderful and relaxing wedding day with the stellar wedding photos to prove it.

With our ceremony being held on site at the venue location, we knew that there would not be any time in between the ceremony and reception to take photos and really soak in the day at our own pace. We would have been rushed and missed our cocktail hour. It seemed to us that it was a no brainer to get pictures done at our leisure before the crowd came and to ensure Jayd had the time to be as creative as she wanted to be!

Looking back… I would not have it any other way, and for even more reasons. Our wedding day was the day for us to celebrate our love and commit ourselves to one another. Yes, we wanted to share the celebration with everyone, but the day was truly for us and the love we share. I will never forget the feeling of when we made the call to Ryan to go wait for me at that perfect spot behind the tree. My heart began to race with excitement. I could not wait for him to see me in the dress I had been keeping a secret for months with my hair and make-up now finished. I had seen his suit, but not all put together and I could not wait to see how handsome he would be. I then took the walk to go meet him. It was as if the day paused to give us a moment alone to keep with us forever. His face, my soon to be husband just looked at me in awe and filled with tears. This was the moment. We had finally reached the day that we had been waiting for. We were able to tell one another how amazing each other looked, how amazing we felt, and how ready we were to enjoy the day. Ryan is my best friend, I was able to share all my thoughts and feelings with him the moment we saw one another. In such an emotional moment, Jayd was able to capture beautiful pictures that are so personal to us. With all of the crazy events that take place leading up to and the day of the wedding, it was such a relief to see Ryan and have him with me. Any nerves were lifted and my heart was able to begin to celebrate with Ryan.

We were able to kiss one another and just be ourselves the hours leading up to the ceremony. Once it was show time, we were able to smile at one another as we got ready to walk down the aisle. All of our friends and family were seated waiting for us and we were ready for them. As we do every other day, we felt like a team. We were going into this ceremony and marriage together and ready. It was perfect!


© Lisa March for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
Permalink |
No comment |
Add to
del.icio.us

Post tags: